Field Report:

The Non-Glamorous Side of Photography

Outdoor Adventure & Baby Boomer Lifestyle Photographer, Sherri Meyer Interview

Professional outdoor adventure and lifestyle photographer, Sherri Meyer is based out of the historic, Sierra Nevada Foothills gold mining town of Auburn, California. Having access to the Sierras as her backyard, she has photographed a variety of adventure sports such as kayaking, marathon running and off-roading. Here are her thoughts on the current state of the stock photography industry:

Hiker viewing the spillway at Clementine Dam, on the north fork of the American River, Auburn, California

Hiker viewing the spillway at Clementine Dam, on the north fork of the American River, Auburn, California

I noticed that a number of your images appear to be of the baby-boomer generation. From what I have read, this is a category that is in demand and under-photographed so was it a conscious business decision of yours to photograph this demographic?

The main reason I photograph “Baby Boomers” is because I am one and most of the people I know are too. Some of them have become regular models for my photography. But, it is also a fact that photos of this generation are of high demand and in low supply. That is the other reason why I focus mainly on the “Boomer” generation. The “Baby Boomer” generation is the largest segment of the population. So why is there such a low supply of photos of them? Go figure! By the way, according to the publishing industry, you are also considered a senior if you are 50 plus. Photos of seniors are also of high demand and in low supply.

From a business perspective, what would you like to photograph that you haven’t already?

I would like to Photograph for REI and Title Nine. I would love to have my attractive and fit “Baby Boomer” models featured in their catalogs. Title Nine does use women of all ages in their catalogs, but REI seems to focus on children and models in their 20′s and 30′s. I really think they are missing the boat by not featuring older models in their catalog also. I would like to change that. Since the “Baby Boomer” generation is the largest segment of the population that means they also spend the most money for products [and typically have the most disposable income.] Therefore, they also deserve to be part of their marketing program! I would also like to do some food product photography. Every month, I pick up the Raley’s “Something Extra” magazine where I shop. It’s a free publication they put out for their customers. It’s full of recipes, accompanied with outstanding food photographs. I love looking at the photos and thinking that is something I would like photograph. Also, one of my sisters photographed food years ago, for the natural food company she and I worked for. I always admired her work. That may be where it all started.

Business reasons aside, what would you like to photograph that you haven’t already?

Cowboys. I have always been attracted to photographs of cowboys. I have stayed at a dude ranch and photographed cowboys, as well as other activities that go on at a dude ranch. I have also photographed rodeos and cowboys performing various other ranch duties. But, what I would really love to do is go on and photograph a real cattle drive. I would also love to photograph singer/songwriters Emmy Lou Harris and Jimmy Buffett, two of my all-time favorites.

Silhouette of a woman running at Mackerricher State Park

Silhouette of a woman running at Mackerricher State Park

When dealing with a client directly, is there a minimum price that you set for negotiations?

Absolutely. Our fees are negotiable; however our minimum fee for any usage is $150.00.

When a potential client inquires about the use of an image and claims to have no budget for photos, there are some amateur photographers out there that are willing to give the client unlimited use of the image for free in exchange for a credit. They generally believe one of two things: 1. it will lead to a higher paying transaction in the future, 2. they only care about seeing their work published so they can brag about it. How do you feel about this?

I don’t think anyone should give their work away for any purpose, period. If your work is good enough to use for free, then it’s good enough to charge for! Richard, this question really hits my hot button. I’m giving you my short answer to this question for now, but I would love to write more in a future post.

Without naming names, tell us about a client from hell type of story.

I have worked with more than one client from h**l and they all have something in common. They have no respect! The three that come to mind were back in my earlier days and they were all regional, low paying markets. One of them was a brand new magazine. The editor knew nothing about working with photographers. I had to educate him about everything. Then, when one of his employees left on bad terms, she left with a CD of my images. Who knows where they ended up? I had another editor lose 4 of my [slides.] After contacting him several times, I managed to get all but one back. One of them was “nowhere” to be found until I sent him a bill for $1500.00. The next day, it was found. Amazing isn’t it? Then, there was the client that lost a whole submission consisting of 40 slides. I billed him also for $1500.00 per image. Soon thereafter, the images were recovered. I didn’t stop there, however. I did get compensated for the inconvenience of it all. The biggest problem with this type of client is they get treated the same way a good paying respectful client gets treated.

Couple hiking through a meadow of wildflowers in the American River Canyon

Couple hiking through a meadow of wildflowers in the American River Canyon

I noticed that you recently switched from the Photoshelter Archive to hosting your own Lightbox photo archive. What factored in your decision to do so?

There are a couple of reasons why I chose to go with Lightbox Photo over PhotoShelter for archiving my images. First, I wanted to have my images on my server rather than someone else’s. It’s more expensive to use Lightbox and there is a huge learning curve to setting up the galleries, but the benefits are worth it. I feel like I have a lot more control of my images, I’m getting more traffic and uploading images is much faster. Don’t get me wrong. I love PhotoShelter. I think they are one of the “best bangs for your buck” out there. I do still use their basic service and I plan to contribute to the new PhotoShelter Collection (PSC) very soon.

Any photography business announcements or personal projects that you would like to tell us about?

I don’t really have anything in the hopper right now, but there are a couple of things I would like to do down the road. I would like to publish a coffee table photography book featuring photos of… We will keep that a secret for now. Also, I would like to teach photo workshops and maybe do a little consulting. I did teach a few classes a couple of years ago which included a photo workshop through the adult education program here in Auburn.

Thanks Sherri. You’ve provided some great insights for the rest of us to ponder.

See more of Sherri Meyer’s work at: http://www.sherrimeyer.com

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August 4, 2008 - Posted by | Interviews, Photo Business, Photographers, stock photography | , , , , ,

14 Comments »

  1. You are right Richard. I really did enjoy this one!

    Comment by Sherri Meyer | August 4, 2008 | Reply

  2. The pictures are beautiful and my hat is off to you as a fine photographer…. There is a beautiful world out there without ipods, cell phones, dvds, etc…right???? Carol Stanley http://www.carolstanley1.com

    Comment by carol stanley | August 4, 2008 | Reply

  3. [...] It is now live and you can check it out over at Fieldnotes: The Non-Glamorous Side of Photography. [...]

    Pingback by Sherri Meyer Photography Blog » Interview with Richard Wong | August 4, 2008 | Reply

  4. Thanks guys.

    Comment by Richard Wong | August 4, 2008 | Reply

  5. Wonderful interview! I am a fairly recent fan of Sherri’s work and I always love reading her thoughts. Well done! In the future, I would love to read more of her thoughts on charging fairly and not undervaluing your work. :)

    Comment by christie provost | August 5, 2008 | Reply

  6. Thanks Christie. I’d be interested in finding out more of Sherri’s thoughts about the industry as well.

    Comment by Richard Wong | August 5, 2008 | Reply

  7. Thanks for the information. Me this theme too interests. I shall read still.

    Comment by Baby R | August 6, 2008 | Reply

  8. Thanks Baby.

    Comment by Richard Wong | August 7, 2008 | Reply

  9. Good story! Thanks.

    Comment by Juha Haataja | August 10, 2008 | Reply

  10. Thanks Juha.

    Comment by Richard Wong | August 11, 2008 | Reply

  11. [...] of people, which is really unusual for me. More importantly, he is a “Baby Boomer!” Photographing “Baby Boomers” is one of my top priorities when shooting for [...]

    Pingback by Sherri Meyer Photography Blog » Photographing Indian Creek | August 27, 2008 | Reply

  12. [...] had stumbled upon my previous interview with Professional Photographer and Writer Richard Wong. A story on Baby Boomer Photography was the perfect fit for his on-line and nationally televised [...]

    Pingback by Sherri Meyer Photography Lands on National Television « Field Report: Photographers | September 7, 2008 | Reply

  13. [...] had stumbled upon my previous interview with Professional Photographer and Writer Richard Wong. A story on Baby Boomer Photography was the perfect fit for his on-line and nationally televised [...]

    Pingback by Sherri Meyer Photography Blog » Sherri Meyer Photography Lands on National Television | September 7, 2008 | Reply

  14. [...] my recent interview with photographer Richard Wong, I mentioned “food photography” as something I wanted to do, that I hadn’t really [...]

    Pingback by Sherri Meyer Photography Blog » A Day at the River Wrap-Up | November 30, 2008 | Reply


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